Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for January, 2010

While in Burma

While in Burma, we will likely not be accessing the What moves you? blog, but we look forward to sharing our experiences upon return to Thailand on the 15th of Feburary.

In the meantime, if you are interested in keeping up with current events and news about Burma, I can recommend visiting the Irrawaddy Online News Magazine.

Read Full Post »

Considering Burma: Equality

WWII never completely ended in Burma. Today, Burma consists of an oppressive central government and hundreds of armed groups and militias along the periphery. Although today fighting is sporadic and largely affects only isolated areas, thousands of refugees remain outside of Burma. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Burmese delegates including Aung San (fourth from right) met British politicians including Prime Minister Clement Attlee (fifth from right) in London to agree an independence deal in January 1947. (Image: Fox Photos/Getty Images)

 “Every man and woman in Burma wanted to get rid of the English government, not because it was oppressive or lacking in good qualities, but because its policy was pro-English instead of being pro-Burman” —excerpt from Maurice Collis book Trials in Burma (1937)

Defeating colonialism became a primary objective by the 1930’s, with a rise in Burmese political activity and nationalism. Anti-colonialist leaders rose and sought opportunities for change in militant ideologies.  Bogyoke Aung San remained greatest among them.  Aung San and a group of university students of his time known as the ‘Do Bama’ society, which one scholar calls “schoolboys playing politics,” were ultimately the ones who led protests, formed the Burmese Independence Army during WWII, and later formed the first independent government. Initially, Aung San sought opportunity and training from the rising power of Japan at the beginning of WWII, who promised Burmese independence. (more…)

Read Full Post »

When considering Burma, you may remember the atrocities committed against protesters in anti-government protests in 1988, recall news clips of Monks and others taking to the streets in 2007, or the lack of access granted by the military government to humanitarian workers following cyclone Nargis in 2008.  Depending on age, maybe you think of nothing more than ‘Burma Shave’ a brushless shaving cream marketed in the US through rhyming poems on small, sequential highway signs. Regardless, few of us have actually considered the complexity that is Burma and how this country fits into the world. As the first major stop on my journey, I’m curious to learn more. (more…)

Read Full Post »

It is Christmas Eve morning and Ryan and I find ourselves on the corner of Heidelberg St & Mt Elliott St, Detroit. The streets are deserted, the houses dilapidated, some boarded up, others burnt out – few of them look inhabited. Every second plot is empty. It is freezing cold and snow is on the ground.  And out of nowhere appears – a cyclist! In a county designed for driving, a city built by the car industry, a part of town with few amenities and no major grocery stores, this middle-aged man cycling in the freezing cold on a dilapidated bike, was as astounding and shocking a sight as the boarded up houses.


(more…)

Read Full Post »

Having arrived in Bangkok on the morning of January 10, Sabrina and I(Ryan) prioritized sleeping and eating above all else. Well fed and well rested, we met up with Michele and Caleb when they arrived in Bangkok on the 14th.
(more…)

Read Full Post »

India and Bangladesh, like all countries that live off mass transit, deliver a particularly distilled essence at the focal points of their comings and goings. In India’s case, this is at the train stations, where humanity in all its colors descends into one crossroads. In Bangladesh, where rivers are everywhere, flowing through every town, the passenger launch docks in each city are the inflection points of human life, the arenas where nature’s tendency toward entropy becomes manifest.

Here, on these narrow floating strips, surrounded by the cartoonishly over-sized trappings of maritime equipment, the industrial work of moving human beings meets the frenetic diversity of life in this place. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »